How to get started with Bitcoin mining.

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale AwardsBlock rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB TokensSecond place: 100,000 CKB TokensThird place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: LotteryAt the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules:We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
DatesStart Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to ParticipateTo start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
TermsTerms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
submitted by totorun to gpumining [link] [comments]

BFGMiner Garlicoin tutorial

Some people have been having trouble with BFGMiner for Garlicoin, so I made a tutorial. This will only work on a Unix-based shell.
I have been informed that the Pastebin may not be beginner-friendly, so I will help anyone who needs it.
Thanks to ChilledGrease for their help with making the tutorial.
  1. Download and extract http://www.digip.org/jansson/releases/jansson-2.10.tar.gz
  2. cd to the folder and run ./configure && make && make install
  3. Download and extract https://github.com/troydhanson/uthash/archive/master.zip
  4. Download and extract http://luke.dashjr.org/programs/bitcoin/files/bfgmine4.10.6/bfgminer-4.10.6.zip
  5. cd to the bfgminer folder and run env CFLAGS='-I../uthash-mastesrc' ./configure --enable-opencl --enable-scrypt --enable-cpumining, assuming uthash-master is the directory you extracted in part 3.
  6. Run make && make install. If it says you do not have permission to do something, run sudo make install and enter your password.
  7. Set up garlicoind and its config. There is a tutorial here.
  8. Run garlicoind.
  9. Run this command: bfgminer --scrypt -o localhost:42070 -u [username in garlicoind config] -p [password] --no-longpoll --no-stratum --coinbase-addr [your address] -S opencl:auto
Citations:
https://askubuntu.com/a/386372
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1260729.0
Edit: Adding citations section as well as CPU mining for those of you who don't want to or can't use a GPU.
Edit 2: Clarifications
Edit 3: Removed CPU mining as I cannot currently get it to work.
Edit 4: I don't want to make a 100000 character long post so I'm not gonna put this anymore.
Edit again: I can't get BFGMiner to work with the new scrypt:2048 algorithm, so this will not work for the time being.
submitted by U8336Tea to garlicoin [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by Lilianli87 to EtherMining [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by ClareKuang to cryptomining [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by ClareKuang to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by Lilianli87 to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by Lilianli87 to MiningRig [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by Lilianli87 to bitcoinxt [link] [comments]

Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition

The Nervos Common Knowledge Base (CKB) is a preservation focused, “Store of Assets” public permissionless blockchain and the base layer of the Nervos network. Nervos generalizes Bitcoin’s UTXO model, creating a ‘cell model’ that supports smart contracts and Layer 2 protocols with a RISC-V virtual machine.
Check out the Nervos CKB in a Nutshell article!: https://medium.com/nervosnetwork/nervos-ckb-in-a-nutshell-7a4ac8f99e0e
Nervos CKB Testnet Mining Competition - https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/ To provide the community increased opportunities for involvement in the construction of Nervos CKB, the Nervos Foundation has officially decided to sponsor and host the Nervos CKB testnet mining competition. Anyone (outside of U.S. citizens unfortunately 😬) can participate in the event by mining testnet tokens and compete for a total prize of 1 million mainnet CKB tokens.
Reward One: Mining Whale Awards Block rewards produced by each address will be ranked. Upon the completion of competition, the top three addresses that have mined the highest amount of block rewards will be rewarded as follows:
First place: 200,000 CKB Tokens Second place: 100,000 CKB Tokens Third place: 60,000 CKB Tokens
Reward Two: Lottery At the end of competition, 64 addresses will be randomly selected from addresses that have produced blocks (with the top three addresses excluded) and will be given 10,000 CKB tokens as rewards.
Lottery Rules: We will release the code base for lottery drawing ahead of time and use the block hash of the block at Nth block height as the seed for random number generation for selecting the lucky addresses.
We will announce a hash at the same time; the hash’s preimage will include information about N.
Participants will be able to use announced hash and lottery code to verify the outcome of the lottery.
Dates Start Time: Saturday, June 15, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1560578400 At this time, participants can download the latest version of CKB client (v0.14.0) from GitHub releases https://github.com/nervosnetwork/ckb/releases, start a node, join the testnet and start mining.
End Time: Saturday, June 29, 2019 6:00:00 AM UTC, UNIX Timestamp: 1561788000 Based on the UNIX timestamp of the block, the competition will end and the block reward rankings will be calculated.
How to Participate To start mining on CKB testnet, simply follow the steps outlined in the official guide https://docs.nervos.org/ or community-created tutorials https://talk.nervos.org/. A CKB blockchain browser https://explorer.nervos.org/ is available to check mining rewards.
Upon the completion of competition, we will calculate block rewards mined by each address. The accumulated block reward of each address during the competition will be the basis for determining the competition's winning miners and recipients of CKB mainnet token prizes (testnet tokens gained by transactions will NOT be counted as block rewards).
Rewards will be distributed directly to respective addresses on CKB mainnet. Hence, please exercise caution when managing your private key as it will be your sole means of claiming your CKB mainnet token rewards.
Things to Note
Terms Terms and Conditions:
Disclaimer:
Contact Us
Link: https://mineyourownbusiness.nervos.org/
submitted by ClareKuang to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

Step by step in staking Redd with Raspberry Pi 3

Before I start, I would like to pay complete credits to these two guys :)
https://www.reddcointalk.org/topic/2679/reddcoin-staking-via-ubuntu-mate-on-raspberry-pi-3-model-b-march-2018 (most of my steps, if not all, are from this link)
https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin/blob/mastedoc/build-arm.md
All the steps I am writing is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY, please don't try to skip it because I did, and it doesn't work.
step 1: get a Raspberry Pi B https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/#buy-now-modal
step 2: make sure you get proper power supply 5v 2A - the Pi will mine, it will need sufficient power. Regular USB samsung charger will not work.
step 3: get proper micro SD card (SanDisk for example) 32Gb++
step 4: USB + Mouse keyboard
step 5: flash micro SD card with Ubuntu MATE
Download Ubuntu Mate image: https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi/
Download Etcher: https://etcher.io
After finishing downloading, use Etcher to write/flash the image on micro SD card
After this, your SD card contains Ubuntu MATE OS.
step 6: Place SD Card into Raspberry Pi 3 and start it up. You should be able to see Ubuntu OS! Congrats!
step 7: Connect to wifi or internet cable (internet is better and faster)
step 8: OPTIONAL - turn off UI OS, so that things will work faster
Open XTerminal:
sudo systemctl disable lightdm.service (to turn UI off) 
in case you want to turn UI on again, run this:
sudo systemctl start lightdm.service (to turn UI on) 
step 9: install all dependencies
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install git build-essential libqt4-dev libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libtool autotools-dev autoconf libssl-dev libboost-all-dev wget pkg-config sudo add-apt-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install db4.8 sudo apt-get install libminiupnpc-dev sudo apt-get install libqrencode-dev Reboot 
step 10: add additional RAM (sort of) in case the App need it, this is call "Create Swap file"
sudo fallocate -l 1G /swapfile sudo chmod 600 /swapfile sudo mkswap /swapfile sudo swapon /swapfile echo ‘/swapfile none swap sw 0 0’ | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab 
step 11: Build Berkeley Database
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz tar xfvz db-4.8.30.NC.tar.gz cd db-4.8.30.NC cd build_unix ../dist/configure --enable-cxx make sudo make install 
step 11.5: Set BerkeleyDB path
export CPATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/include" export LIBRARY_PATH="/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib" export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/uslocal/BerkeleyDB.4.8/lib/ 
step 12: Build Reddcoin Wallet
---download source code ---- only source from joroob/reddcoin will work because some stweak was needed for ARM CPU
cd ~ git clone https://github.com/joroob/reddcoin.git 
---build reddcoin ----
cd reddcoin ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-gui=no --disable-tests cd src make sudo make install 
If you finish this, you are in a great position!!!
step 13: Create reddcoin configuration file
cd ~ mkdir .reddcoin && cd .reddcoin nano reddcoin.conf rpcuser=YOUR OWN USERNAME, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT rpcpassword=YOUR OWN PASS WORD, YOU DONT NEED TO REMEMBER THIS, MAKE IT AS LONG AS YOU WANT 
step 14: Use bootstrap
(At this point, you had a running reddcoin daemon, now you can start staking. But syncing the full chain takes long time.)
cd ~/.reddcoin wget https://github.com/reddcoin-project/reddcoin/releases/download/v2.0.1.2/bootstrap.dat.xz xz -d bootstrap.dat.xz 
step 15: start the reddcoin daemon service cd ~/reddcoin/src ./reddcoind -daemon
After this, you can test if the daemon is working, by perform this command: ./reddcoin-cli getblockcount
step 16: if your app is not able to sync, it is probably the firewall issue with OS, run this to allow port 45444 (used by Reddcoin) and redo step 15
sudo iptables -I INPUT 1 -i eth0 -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT sudo iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 45444 -j ACCEPT 
step 17: open BEER and enjoy! This is a MUST or the daemon will stop working! I am not kidding!
step 18: Actually, i forgot to mention you need to execute this command for the wallet to stake:
reddcoind walletpassphrase $yourpassword 9999999 true 
ADDITIONAL REMARKS:
From my PC: I am using putty to execute the command, winSCP to monitor the file location on raspberry.
Moving Red Coins out of exchange really a big move, start with normal wallet, don't start with this tutorial :) Ever since I move my coins out of exchange, I am free from all of the ups and downs! Really!
So guys and gals, Redd On!
UPDATE 18 Mar: my first stake has arrived after 6 days staking :)
In case you want to tip me: RaF3TeWqgTzAdnaZQffnsxS74dag13zsAY
Edit 1: Format stuff
Edit 2: Add step 18 to execute staking command.
Edit 3: In case you don't want to compile the source code, you can download my compile version here: https://github.com/hieplenet/reddcoin/releases/tag/v2.0.0.0 (but doing this, you should be aware of the risk of me changing source code for my benefit - I don't change any thing, but you should be cautious, this is the internet :) )
submitted by hieplenet to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Who Has Your Back in Crypto?

http://hackingdistributed.com/2017/08/26/whos-your-crypto-buddy/
Who Has Your Back in Crypto?
Saturday August 26, 2017 at 01:55 PM
Emin Gün Sirer
I came across a Twitter poll on which entities have their interests and priorities most closely aligned with Bitcoin users. The results, if they are to be believed, indicate an enormous misunderstanding, or else they betray the result of a successful disinformation campaign. To wit, more than 60% of the respondants believe that the devs have users' interests at heart. Only 23% trust businesses, and a mere 15% say the miners.
This is completely wrong.
In general, open-source (OSS) developers, especially second generation developers who were not present at the inception of the project, have skewed interests that are at odds with those of the users. Depending on your investment thesis, either the miners or businesses have their economic interest best aligned with users. Let's discuss why.
It is incredibly common and ordinary for second generation developers to add gratuitous complexity and bloat to a project. There are two reasons that compel them to do this.
Wanna Be Famous I got your back One reason is to simply leave their unique mark. After all, how else would anyone know that the developers are any good? What new line do the developers get to put on their resumes, or which files do they point to in github on subsequent job interviews? "Added Schnorr signatures" sounds far more impressive than "I responded to bug reports and refactored a 5000-line main.cpp file" no matter how useless and cumbersome Schnorr signatures may be to use in practice, and how badly a refactoring was needed [1].
This means that projects often evolve by incorporating vanity features, typically by force of pure ego. Your typical primadonna dev will want to add a dessert table to the banquet instead of slicing up the bread, because that's what turns heads. Especially when there is turnover in a team, the next generation often rush to leave their mark.
A well-known example and ongoing fail-mobile is the systemd project, where a Linux developer named Poettering is trying to import into Linux all of Windows' problems. Like PulseAudio before it, systemd cites legitimate areas where Linux needs improving, but then breaks away from the underlying Unix aesthetic in every possible way. Poettering and his team can't be satisfied with incremental fixes that preserve the original vision -- it is essential that they redo things in their completely unique way, which totally isn't a bug, except I couldn't hear you when we had PulseAudio and I can't parse my logs now, can't install an update without rebooting my machine like a Windows pleb, and sometimes can't start up my system and it's totally not a bug.
Wanna Be Rich I got your back The second reason is to make themselves indispensable, by increasing the complexity of the OSS project. Many open source developers are uncredentialed, young people with few other accomplishments and job prospects, looking to break into a lucrative industry. A complex code base immediately makes them an expert because they know all its warts and they know where all the skeletons are buried in the code. That's because they put them there. This immediately guarantees a consulting stream. You want to add a tweak? Well, you can't, you need to hire someone who understands the mess.
The best example for this is Asterisk [2]. An OSS project so complex, no one can do anything other than what's explicitly in the tutorials, and even then, it requires magic incantations and blood sacrifice. For those who do not know, Asterisk is a system for building phone management systems. You would think that audio management would involve the composition of nice, modular units, with uniform interfaces and clean configuration files. You'd be wrong. When I last looked, there were no abstractions in Asterisk. Things just barely worked for the few use cases, and only if you did everything the way you were prescribed. If you went off script, everything would break down. "If you do A, then B, then X, then S, you'll get the effect you want, because X relies on B's setup and leaves the state ..." you get the point. The people who have mastered this completely useless tangle of constraints ensure a steady income stream and enjoy a standing within their own community of people who do not know better of being an "expert." It's like being an expert at naming things, it sounds like a discipline, almost like science, but it's all just a bunch of does-not-matter in the end.
It is the rare person who can create something, stand behind it, put in the grueling hours to respond to bugs and errors, and then see others get rich off of it, without any trace of wanting to participate in the action. So if the code base does not provide a direct way of compensating the developers, rest assured that the developers will find a way.
Consequences These motivations are short-sighted and self-limiting. They drive away new devs from entering the space and strangle the project. The behaviors above are rewarded in the short-term, but spell the beginning of the convalescence phase for a project.
What About Cryptocurrencies? I got your back So who has your best interests at heart when it comes to cryptocurrencies? Is it the miners, the businesses, or the developers?
If you hold coins, your interests are aligned with those who hold massive amounts of coins. That's not developers. It's most definitely not second-generation developers who were not there on day one when coins were cheap.
If you believe the currency will gain value by expanding its community, you are aligned with those who desparately want the economy to expand. That's also not developers.
Miners hold massive amounts of coins. Businesses want a bigger economy, more users and fast coin turnover.
In contrast, developers have complex games they play. Sure, they want the coin value to grow, but not drastically more than your cousin Joe that you somehow convinced to go into your favorite coin with you. If they weren't there for the pre-mine, they wouldn't even have that many coins. While we all hate pre-mines, they do provide the right incentives for the long-term success of the coin.
Another way to analyze the situation is to look at the potential losses to be incurred by the different entities. A miner has 100s of millions of dollars' worth of hardware they have committed to the future success of the currency. A typical startup will have a few to tens of millions at risk. Collectively, VCs have poured more than a billion into the cryptocurrency space and they want to see it expand tenfold for returns.
In contrast, a typical second-generation dev has invested just their own time, which may possibly have been partially subsidized by a firm and so came at $0 cost. They'd have an average number of coins [3]. It's often unclear that they would have had better prospects elsewhere. Developers rage-quit and walk away from projects all the time. The worst that can happen to many devs, whose visions are flawed and whose bets turn out to completely tank a project, is to have to switch IRC channels, clone a different but similar git repository, and muzzle their toxicity for a short while as they integrate themselves into a different social hierarchy.
Takeaway I got your back When evaluating statements from miners, businesses and developers, cast your lot accordingly. No one likes corporations; many large and monopolistic ones tend to eke out profits at the expense of their users. Miners, well, they tend to be predominantly Chinese these days due to abundance of excess hydro power over there, so, if someone is the sieg-heilin', statue-lovin', hitler-would-have-been-alright-if-he-had-obtained-marching-permits type [4], it's clear what one would think. And developers have the benefit of actually having a face, and for some, a 7x24 social media presence that makes you first wonder how they do development, then realize that they don't do much development at all. And the thing about troll-backed deceptive narratives is that they sound all so good, and so popular -- all those likes and upvotes from those nameless trolls in those censored forums must indicate something, right?
Yet the underlying forces are precisely the opposite of how things might seem on a naive, superficial examination.
Of course, in an ideal world, people would evaluate proposals from a scientific perspective, instead of casting their lot with a particular tribe. And the ecosystem would not have distinct roles where people with different roles have goals in opposition to others. Whoever can invent that coin, whoever can build a community based on reasoned, civil, scientific discussion, is sure to make a killing.
[1] Bitcoin's main.cpp file used to be 5000 lines long, and quixotically, remained so for many years. Schnorr signatures are nice, there is nothing wrong with them, and we all need them as much as we need a second prehensile tail. "Wait, we don't even have a first one," you might say. That would be the point.
[2] I was an avid Asterisk user for multiple years, thanks to a high pain tolerance that also allows me to work on cryptocurrencies. While it was fun to automatically screen telemarketers, to redirect calls to my nearest phone, and to play hold muzak for people who called the house, the underlying software was nothing but just bloat, with no attention paid to clean interfaces and repurposable components.
[3] On average, people are average. One could claim that developers would more consistently buy in, comparable to more fervent currency fans, but one could also claim that they would want to diversify their risk as well. From my own personal observation, many crypto investors have personal wealth that far exceeds early developers.
[4] He did, in fact, have a permit.
Emin Gün Sirer - Hacker and professor at Cornell, with interests that span distributed systems, OSes and networking. Current projects include HyperDex, OpenReplica and the Nexus OS. more...
submitted by shadowdanme to btc [link] [comments]

[Guide] How to tether your Macbook to your iOS Device, no jailbreak required!

After upgrading to the iPhone 7 Plus from a jailbroken 6 Plus, I sorely missed having the ability to tether my Macbook Pro to my phone. I did some research today and after numerous failed attempts, I came across a relatively simple way to tether without the need to sideload any IPAs.
This guide will focus on Mac but it should be possible on Windows/Linux as well.

What you'll need:

How it works

This method takes advantage of a feature of the vSSH iOS app called port forwarding, which enables us to set up a SOCKS proxy between the iPhone and a remote Linux server. Then, we can use a proxy client on the Mac to connect to the proxy on the iPhone. Here's a crude MS-Paint diagram: http://i.imgur.com/Bt6BiqO.png

Set up DigitalOcean

If you have your own server or already know how to set one up, you can skip this section.
Follow this guide to set up your DigitalOcean Virtual Private Server (VPS) with the following settings:
When you get to the step in the guide titled "Log In To Your Droplet", take note of the IP address as you will need this later. Also, for the new root password choose something secure and memorable, or generate it with a password manager. If you choose a weak password, automated bots will potentially brute force it and use your droplet to mine Bitcoin or set up phishing sites.

Start an Ad-Hoc network on your Laptop

  1. Click on your Wireless icon in your menu bar, then select "Create Network":
    • Network Name: Whatever you want
    • Channel: 1

Connect to your Ad-Hoc network from your iPhone

  1. Settings > Wifi
  2. Choose the network you just created
  3. Click "Join Anyway"
  4. You may want to forget any other wifi networks in-range so your phone doesn't try to connect to them instead, since this network has no internet access.

Connect to your server through vSSH on your iPhone

  1. Open vSSH and tap the "+" icon in the upper left-hand corner of the "Connections" tab, then select "Connection" from the popup. Use the following settings:
    • Name: Tether
    • Protocol: SSH
    • Connection
    • Host: The IP address of your server
    • Port: 22
    • Username: root
    • Password: the password you set up earlier
    • Autoconnect: Enabled (optional)
    • No shell: Disabled
    • Screen Size: ignore
    • Port Forwarding:
    • Click "Add Port Forwarding"
      • Type: Dynamic
      • Host: 127.0.0.1
      • Port: 8080
      • Accept All Connections: Enabled
    • Leave everything else as default.
  2. Tap on your new connection profile to connect to your server. You should soon see a connection message with the Linux version, license information, and a shell prompt like "$". At this point all you need to do in vSSH is leave the app open and your phone unlocked.

Connect your Macbook to your iPhone through the vSSH proxy

  1. Make sure you have Proxifier installed.
  2. Visit this Github repo and clone it, or download it as a zip and unzip it somewhere.
  3. Open Terminal.app. You can do this through Spotlight by searching for Terminal.
  4. Drag and drop the file called tethery.sh onto the Terminal window. Press enter.
  5. Proxifier should open. If you're using the trial, click "Continue Evaluation". Give everything a moment to settle in...
  6. Your computer should now be tethered to your iPhone. You may need to restart any web browsers or applications to get them to use the proxy.
Hopefully this is helpful to someone.
Credits:
submitted by davros_ to iphone [link] [comments]

[Guide] How to tether your Macbook to your iOS Device for free, no jailbreak required!

Preface

I have an unlimited everything data plan with Sprint, but they charge an extra $20 to $50 per month for 2gb and 6gb of personal hotspot (tethering) data, respectively.
When I had a jailbroken 6 Plus, I used to use MyWi to tether my phone to my Macbook. After upgrading to the iPhone 7 Plus, I sorely missed having this ability.
I did some research today and after numerous failed attempts, I came across a relatively simple way to tether without the need to sideload any IPAs.
This guide will focus on Mac but it should be possible on Windows/Linux as well.
At first glance it looks like a lot of steps, but I have tried to elaborate on everything so that even a non-technical person should be able to follow along.
If you have a decent amount of technical knowledge, you should be able to set everything up in under 20 minutes and after that enabling tethering only takes about 30 seconds or less each time.
My other post on /iphone got downvoted to oblivion for some reason, hopefully this community is more receptive?

What you'll need:

How it works

This method takes advantage of a feature of the vSSH iOS app called port forwarding, which enables us to set up a SOCKS proxy between the iPhone and a remote Linux server. Then, we can use a proxy client on the Mac to connect to the proxy on the iPhone. Here's a crude MS-Paint diagram: http://i.imgur.com/Bt6BiqO.png

Set up DigitalOcean

If you have your own server or already know how to set one up, you can skip this section.
Follow this guide to set up your DigitalOcean Virtual Private Server (VPS) with the following settings:
When you get to the step in the guide titled "Log In To Your Droplet", take note of the IP address as you will need this later. Also, for the new root password choose something secure and memorable, or generate it with a password manager. If you choose a weak password, automated bots will potentially brute force it and use your droplet to mine Bitcoin or set up phishing sites.

Start an Ad-Hoc network on your Laptop

  1. Click on your Wireless icon in your menu bar, then select "Create Network":
    • Network Name: Whatever you want
    • Channel: 1

Connect to your Ad-Hoc network from your iPhone

  1. Settings > Wifi
  2. Choose the network you just created
  3. Click "Join Anyway"
  4. You may want to forget any other wifi networks in-range so your phone doesn't try to connect to them instead, since this network has no internet access.

Connect to your server through vSSH on your iPhone

  1. Open vSSH and tap the "+" icon in the upper left-hand corner of the "Connections" tab, then select "Connection" from the popup. Use the following settings:
    • Name: Tether
    • Protocol: SSH
    • Connection
    • Host: The IP address of your server
    • Port: 22
    • Username: root
    • Password: the password you set up earlier
    • Autoconnect: Enabled (optional)
    • No shell: Disabled
    • Screen Size: ignore
    • Port Forwarding:
    • Click "Add Port Forwarding"
      • Type: Dynamic
      • Host: 127.0.0.1
      • Port: 8080
      • Accept All Connections: Enabled
    • Leave everything else as default.
  2. Tap on your new connection profile to connect to your server. You should soon see a connection message with the Linux version, license information, and a shell prompt like "$". At this point all you need to do in vSSH is leave the app open and your phone unlocked.

Connect your Macbook to your iPhone through the vSSH proxy

  1. Make sure you have Proxifier installed.
  2. Visit this Github repo and clone it, or download it as a zip and unzip it somewhere.
  3. Open Terminal.app. You can do this through Spotlight by searching for Terminal.
  4. Drag and drop the file called tethery.sh onto the Terminal window. Press enter.
  5. Proxifier should open. If you're using the trial, click "Continue Evaluation". Give everything a moment to settle in...
  6. Your computer should now be tethered to your iPhone. You may need to restart any web browsers or applications to get them to use the proxy.
Hopefully this is helpful to someone.
Credits:
submitted by davros_ to ios [link] [comments]

Beginner's guide to solo bitcoin and litecoin mining ... How To Mine 1 Bitcoin in 10 Minutes - Blockchain BTC Miner ... Bitcoin Basics (Part 1) - tutorial: Bitcoin mining with CGMiner - YouTube Noob's Guide To Bitcoin Mining - Super Easy & Simple - YouTube

Click the large blue Download Bitcoin Core button to download the Bitcoin Core installer to your Downloads folder. Optional: Verify the release signatures. If you know how to use PGP, you should also click the Verify Release Signatures link on the download page to download a signed list of SHA256 file hashes. The 0.11 and later releases are signed by Wladimir J. van der Laan’s releases key w Btcmines is a new kind of Bitcoin Faucet where you feed little miners and they mine bitcoin for you. Dont worry, it is NOT a cpu miner. How much can I earn? There are no limits. You can hammer away at our faucet till you have had enough. There are no restrictions. You are only limited by the number of miners and mines you own. 5% Referral Bonus. We give you a 5% for all referrals, for life ... This tutorial will teach you blockchain technology, the driving force behind the cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. You will learn various aspects of cryptography, process of creating and chaining Blocks, Network & Mining and many other concepts associated with blockchain technology including designing of a blockchain network. 4. EasyMiner. EasyMiner is a GUI based software and it acts as a convenient wrapper for CGMiner and BFGMiner software.. EasyMiner can be used for solo mining, CPU mining, cuda mining, pool mining etc and it supports the stratum and getwork mining protocols. When available, it automatically uses AVX, AVX2, and SSE2. 5. BitMinter. BitMinter is a mining pool that wants bitcoin mining to be easy ... Start earning Bitcoin now! Home; Affilite Program; Payouts; FAQ; Contacts; Welcome to leading Bitcoin mining pool! Our members already received 1966.5970722 Bitcoins since launch 1499 days ago. Start Mining We aim to provide you with the easiest possible way to make money without having to do any of the hard stuff. Start mining . StartMiner v1.0 Free. Earning Rate. 0.0000002 BTC/min. Profit ...

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Beginner's guide to solo bitcoin and litecoin mining ...

Some Helpful Links: • Buy Parts for a Mining Rig: http://amzn.to/2jSSsCz • Download NiceHash Miner: https://www.nicehash.com/?p=nhmintro • Choose a Wallet: h... Get our free Bitcoin course here - https://chrisdunn.com/free-bitcoin-course This Bitcoin basics video series will explain Bitcoin for beginners. You'll lear... What it really takes to mine a Bitcoin in 10 Minutes. Firstly I'll show you a special free method to mine Bitcoin and send funds directly to your wallet in 1... Learn how to use and setup a bitcoin miner to earn bitcoins , litecoins , dogeecoins etc. Download miner from https://easyminer.net/Downloads/ *ATTENTION* Nicehash has updated their program and the UI is very different from this video. I made an updated video so you can all follow along. Here is the...

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